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Online Shopping in China – The Statistics

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by Liliya Akhtemova – Intern at MooMu Media  

 

China is posed to become the biggest online market in the world within the next few years. By 2015, the sales volume of China’s e-commerce is expected to reach more than $2 trillion, according to E-commerce 12th Five-Year Plan (2011-15), released by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology of China.

 

So, how does the online market in China look today?

 

The Internet in mainland China continues to grow in popularity among citizens. New sales platforms and diversified products are appearing online every day, and electronic payment systems and delivery methods are also maturing. Therefore, online shopping is becoming more popular as well as growing in market size.

 
According to statistical data, by the end of 2011, the number of Chinese Internet users climbed to 510 million, Internet penetration rate reached 38% and over 190 million Chinese people were online shoppers (more than any other country).

 

Chinese consumers shop online three times more frequently than European shoppers and nearly twice as often as online shoppers in the US and the UK.

 

Around 70% of Internet users in mainland China shop online at least once a week, in comparison with around 40% in the USA and UK, and nearly 20% for Netherlands, France and Switzerland, according to PwC’s latest global multi-channel retail survey.

 

10 interesting facts about the online market in China:

 

  1.  Proportion of male and female online shoppers – 52:48
  2.  Online shoppers 18-30 years old: 60.8%
  3. The main reason for shopping online– competitive prices (48.4%).
  4.  More than 70% of Chinese online shoppers most often buy clothes and shoes.
  5.  Increasing E-commerce sales in China amounted to only 4.1% of total retail sales in 2011.
  6. Taobao in China, owned by Alibaba, is frequently “eBay of China”.
  7. Chinese shoppers are developing the habit of not relying on search engines to find products online. (Stay tuned for our follow-up article on this topic).
  8. According to Mashable, the three big Internet companies in China are Alibaba, Baidu and Tencent, which dominate three different categories of the market: e-commerce, search and messaging.
  9. According to a White Paper on the development of Internet Marketing career in China, in 2012 Chinese enterprises need 1.16 million internet marketing professionals.
  10. A report from the China Electronic Commerce Research Center shows that in the first half of 2012, 58,613 complaints were received from Chinese e-commerce users through online, telephone, mail and other forms. Among them, complaints from group purchase sites accounted for 20.1%, mobile e-commerce amounted to 6.7%.

The main online shopping platforms in China

 

 

Online Shopping Statistics China

 by Liliya Akhtemova – Intern at MooMu Media  

 

China is posed to become the biggest online market in the world within the next few years. By 2015, the sales volume of China’s e-commerce is expected to reach more than $2 trillion, according to E-commerce 12th Five-Year Plan (2011-15), released by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology of China.

 

So, how does the online market in China look today?

 

The Internet in mainland China continues to grow in popularity among citizens. New sales platforms and diversified products are appearing online every day, and electronic payment systems and delivery methods are also maturing. Therefore, online shopping is becoming more popular as well as growing in market size.

 
According to statistical data, by the end of 2011, the number of Chinese Internet users climbed to 510 million, Internet penetration rate reached 38% and over 190 million Chinese people were online shoppers (more than any other country).

 

Chinese consumers shop online three times more frequently than European shoppers and nearly twice as often as online shoppers in the US and the UK.

 

Around 70% of Internet users in mainland China shop online at least once a week, in comparison with around 40% in the USA and UK, and nearly 20% for Netherlands, France and Switzerland, according to PwC’s latest global multi-channel retail survey.

 

10 interesting facts about the online market in China:

 

  1.  Proportion of male and female online shoppers – 52:48
  2.  Online shoppers 18-30 years old: 60.8%
  3. The main reason for shopping online– competitive prices (48.4%).
  4.  More than 70% of Chinese online shoppers most often buy clothes and shoes.
  5.  Increasing E-commerce sales in China amounted to only 4.1% of total retail sales in 2011.
  6. Taobao in China, owned by Alibaba, is frequently “eBay of China”.
  7. Chinese shoppers are developing the habit of not relying on search engines to find products online. (Read our Follow up post on search engine use in China).
  8. According to Mashable, the three big Internet companies in China are Alibaba, Baidu and Tencent, which dominate three different categories of the market: e-commerce, search and messaging.
  9. According to a White Paper on the development of Internet Marketing career in China, in 2012 Chinese enterprises need 1.16 million internet marketing professionals.
  10. A report from the China Electronic Commerce Research Center shows that in the first half of 2012, 58,613 complaints were received from Chinese e-commerce users through online, telephone, mail and other forms. Among them, complaints from group purchase sites accounted for 20.1%, mobile e-commerce amounted to 6.7%.

The main online shopping platforms in China

 

 

Online Shopping Statistics China

 by Liliya Akhtemova – Intern at MooMu Media  

 

China is posed to become the biggest online market in the world within the next few years. By 2015, the sales volume of China’s e-commerce is expected to reach more than $2 trillion, according to E-commerce 12th Five-Year Plan (2011-15), released by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology of China.

 

So, how does the online market in China look today?

 

The Internet in mainland China continues to grow in popularity among citizens. New sales platforms and diversified products are appearing online every day, and electronic payment systems and delivery methods are also maturing. Therefore, online shopping is becoming more popular as well as growing in market size.

 
According to statistical data, by the end of 2011, the number of Chinese Internet users climbed to 510 million, Internet penetration rate reached 38% and over 190 million Chinese people were online shoppers (more than any other country).

 

Chinese consumers shop online three times more frequently than European shoppers and nearly twice as often as online shoppers in the US and the UK.

 

Around 70% of Internet users in mainland China shop online at least once a week, in comparison with around 40% in the USA and UK, and nearly 20% for Netherlands, France and Switzerland, according to PwC’s latest global multi-channel retail survey.

 

10 interesting facts about the online market in China:

 

  1.  Proportion of male and female online shoppers – 52:48
  2.  Online shoppers 18-30 years old: 60.8%
  3. The main reason for shopping online– competitive prices (48.4%).
  4.  More than 70% of Chinese online shoppers most often buy clothes and shoes.
  5.  Increasing E-commerce sales in China amounted to only 4.1% of total retail sales in 2011.
  6. Taobao in China, owned by Alibaba, is frequently “eBay of China”.
  7. Chinese shoppers are developing the habit of not relying on search engines to find products online. (Stay tuned for our follow-up article on this topic).
  8. According to Mashable, the three big Internet companies in China are Alibaba, Baidu and Tencent, which dominate three different categories of the market: e-commerce, search and messaging.
  9. According to a White Paper on the development of Internet Marketing career in China, in 2012 Chinese enterprises need 1.16 million internet marketing professionals.
  10. A report from the China Electronic Commerce Research Center shows that in the first half of 2012, 58,613 complaints were received from Chinese e-commerce users through online, telephone, mail and other forms. Among them, complaints from group purchase sites accounted for 20.1%, mobile e-commerce amounted to 6.7%.

The main online shopping platforms in China

 

 

Online Shopping Statistics China

 by Liliya Akhtemova – Intern at MooMu Media  

 

China is posed to become the biggest online market in the world within the next few years. By 2015, the sales volume of China’s e-commerce is expected to reach more than $2 trillion, according to E-commerce 12th Five-Year Plan (2011-15), released by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology of China.

 

So, how does the online market in China look today?

 

The Internet in mainland China continues to grow in popularity among citizens. New sales platforms and diversified products are appearing online every day, and electronic payment systems and delivery methods are also maturing. Therefore, online shopping is becoming more popular as well as growing in market size.

 
According to statistical data, by the end of 2011, the number of Chinese Internet users climbed to 510 million, Internet penetration rate reached 38% and over 190 million Chinese people were online shoppers (more than any other country).

 

Chinese consumers shop online three times more frequently than European shoppers and nearly twice as often as online shoppers in the US and the UK.

 

Around 70% of Internet users in mainland China shop online at least once a week, in comparison with around 40% in the USA and UK, and nearly 20% for Netherlands, France and Switzerland, according to PwC’s latest global multi-channel retail survey.

 

10 interesting facts about the online market in China:

 

  1.  Proportion of male and female online shoppers – 52:48
  2.  Online shoppers 18-30 years old: 60.8%
  3. The main reason for shopping online– competitive prices (48.4%).
  4.  More than 70% of Chinese online shoppers most often buy clothes and shoes.
  5.  Increasing E-commerce sales in China amounted to only 4.1% of total retail sales in 2011.
  6. Taobao in China, owned by Alibaba, is frequently “eBay of China”.
  7. Chinese shoppers are developing the habit of not relying on search engines to find products online. (Stay tuned for our follow-up article on this topic).
  8. According to Mashable, the three big Internet companies in China are Alibaba, Baidu and Tencent, which dominate three different categories of the market: e-commerce, search and messaging.
  9. According to a White Paper on the development of Internet Marketing career in China, in 2012 Chinese enterprises need 1.16 million internet marketing professionals.
  10. A report from the China Electronic Commerce Research Center shows that in the first half of 2012, 58,613 complaints were received from Chinese e-commerce users through online, telephone, mail and other forms. Among them, complaints from group purchase sites accounted for 20.1%, mobile e-commerce amounted to 6.7%.

The main online shopping platforms in China

 

 

Online Shopping Statistics China

 

Dominating Search Results – Restaurant Marketing

By | SEO | No Comments

 By Tracy Mu Sung – Director at MooMu Media

I was just Googling “Laksa in Crows Nest” (because I have a hankering for Laksa, and Crows Nest has a tonne of restaurants) – and check out the total domination of the search results by Sam’s Laksa House! Does it inspire you to dominate your niche using SEO or PPC?  (Note that Sam’s doesn’t even have a website!)

 

 

 

Google Shopping Goes Paid – 17th October

By | Google News, PPC | No Comments

On 17th October, Google Merchant Centre users in the USA will no longer receive free clicks through Google Shopping/Product search, but instead will have to fight it out in the paid bids similar to Product Listing Ads through Adwords.

 

Switching a free, relevance-only offering to paid-inclusion – Evil or just good business sense?

 

Paid Inclusion or Not?

 

Google has stated that ‘paid inclusion’ has historically referred to entries which were not identified as paid, whereas their paid shopping entries will all be labelled appropriately.

 

Other people (including the US Federal Trade Commission) see paid inclusion as any practice of including a result only if payment is made – (which potentially excludes relevant entries if they are not paying).

 

Google Shopping previously provided a huge ‘inventory’ of products, which was very helpful in finding the more obscure products on the web. However, with paid inclusion, how much of that inventory is still going to be searchable?

 

A Good Way To Fight Spam?

 

Should we believe Google that the reason for the change was to encourage advertisers to provide more up to date, high quality feeds? After all, it’s true that if you are paying for each click on your feed, you don’t want to waste clicks on products which aren’t there anymore. Additionally, you want to encourage relevant customers by having the most relevant information in your ads. This will all in turn mean a better user experience for shoppers.

 

However, as Danny Sullivan has pointed out, this could have been achieved by an annual fee, but then again, why would you want that when you could get an almost unlimited revenue of clicks?

 

Also, when they have to charge people to try and minimise spam, what does that say about their technology? Their regular search results are up against much stronger spam every day, is there no hope for them in fighting it?

 

What Else Can We Pay For?

 

The Bigger Worry: What else could Google change to Paid Inclusion?  Many businesses get a huge amount of their business through Google, and have become increasingly reliant on it. The most obvious example of something which could move to Paid inclusion now is Google Places. They have just had a big shakeup to make businesses transfer to Google Plus, could they switch the whole thing again, this time to paid inclusion?

 

We’ll do another post after the changeover to see whether the cost of clicks in PLA adgroups has risen, numbers of competition has increased or maybe some advertisers just refused to pay.

 

The changes will roll out to Australia and the rest of the world probably over the next 12 months.

 

Using Negative Keywords in Google Adwords

By | PPC | No Comments

 By Tracy Mu Sung – Director at MooMu Media

Negative Keywords are those keywords for which you don’t want your ads to appear, and they only need to be used if you have kw matches in your campaign which are phrase or broad match.

 

If all your keywords are exact (unlikely), they won’t show for anything other than those exact KW. If, however you start to broaden your campaign and introduce phrase and broad match keywords, don’t forget to introduce negative KWs at the same time.

 

Examples of negative keywords for an online retailer might be; free, replica, repairs, fake, etc.

 

Note that if your negative keyword is broad, and has more than one word – e.g. free trial – your ad could still show up for searches including either the word free, or trial, but not both. If you didn’t want your ad to show for

  • Free
  • Free trial
  • Trial

You would have to add all three as negative keywords.

 

Match Types for Negative KW

“Negative” is often considered a match type for a kw, but actually, your negative keyword itself can be broad, phrase or exact (with the same definitions). So you can use the match types to define your negative keywords further.

If you have only the exact word [free] as a match type, then your ad might still show for the search query, ‘free books’

So think carefully about your match types.

 

Negative Kw Lists

Google’s “Negative Keyword lists” make it easier to manage your negative keywords across all campaigns.

If you add a new negative kw to a list, it will update to any campaign which uses that list. Similarly for removing negative kw.

To find your lists, go to ‘Shared Library’ in the left hand navigation, then choose, Campaign negative keywords.

How To Use Negative KW in Adwords

Within the Shared Library you can add keywords to a list, or add a list to a campaign.

You can also see these lists at the very bottom of the keywords tab at both the adgroup level and the campaign level. Simply, scroll to the bottom of the Keyword tab, then expand the ‘negative keywords’ link.

 

If you are going to share lists across campaigns, it’s usually a good practice to double check the kw list and make sure it isn’t including inappropriate negatives for any of the campaigns.

 

You can also find negative keywords in your Adwords Editor – by toggling the positives/negatives button as below – however, the Editor does not currently allow you to view keyword lists.

Negative KW in Adwords Editor

 

 

 

 

 

Which Negative Keywords to Use?

New Campaigns/Adgroups/Products/Keywords

When doing KW research for a new product, brand or campaign, note the keywords you find which are inappropriate and might trigger your ads, then add them to your negative KW list.

 

Terms being used

You will also want to look at the ‘See search terms’ report to see other kw which you should add as negatives. Remember to Keep Monitoring the searched terms ongoing.

 


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